Evidentia 3 is finally here!

By | December 11, 2016

Almost 4 years to the day that the first version of Evidentia was released, I am proud to announce the release of version 3.

It took almost 18 months to develop version 3. That’s the same development time as version 1 and version 2 combined (9 months each). That is a testament to how much the genealogy community has taught me over the last 4 years.

I had the help of some great volunteer BETA testers, some of whom even reviewed the help guide and website for me.

Speaking of the website, I hope you find it easier to use than ever before. We have modernized the look and feel, and streamlined the navigation, making it easier for you to find what you are looking for.

Now to answer some questions!

Why the drastic design change?

Last year as I was explaining the software to a conference attendee at our booth, I tried to explain that Evidentia is NOT a citation creation program.  As I was talking, I was thought to myself  “She is not going to believe me, because I am about to show her  three screens that ALL deal with citation  creation”.  I knew i needed to update the design to match the message.

Using the outline of “tasks” I had outlined in the book The Evidentia Companion, I streamlined the screens to match.  Identify your Source, Catalogue your Claims, and Analyze your Evidence are now the featured work screens in Evidentia, with non essential tools pushed to the back.  The initial screens are no longer cluttered with optional fields, although those fields are still available in detailed mode.

Hopefully my conference demos will be more convincing.

What else is new?

Relationships!

Evidentia has never been very good at relationships.  In the past you had to tag a marriage claim twice:  “John married” and “Jane married”, with the implication being they married each other.  This required two identical proofs if you wanted that proof to appear for both parties.

To make matters worse, if John had multiple spouses, they all had to be addressed in the same marriage proof.

Now evidentia does it right.  One tag “John married Jane”.  One proof.  The same information will appear whether you dselect John or Jane. Better yet, the marriage of John to Sarah is a separate proof.

The same goes for parent child relationships.  No more “Parent of Eric”, “Child of John”, “Child of Jane”.  Now evidentia allows you to tag a Child claims with “Eric is a child of John” and “Eric is a Child of Jane”.

Why not “Eric is the Child of John and Jane”?

I considered that, and finally reached out to the Evidentia community and asked which made more sense – prove the three way relationship between a child and their parents, or prove each relationship separately?  The consensus was unanimous:  prove each relationship separately.

See, I listen!

Is the book, The Evidentia Companion, still relevant?

Thats is not an easy question to answer.  The first edition of the Companion has a lot of screenshots, and those screenshots are based on Evidentia 2. Many of the steps by step elements in the book will need to be tweaked.

However the methodology defined in the book was used as the template for the design of Evidentia 3.  If anything the book and software align even better.

So yes, the book definitely still provides value.

And yes a new edition of the Companion based on Evidentia 3 screenshots is in the works.  No publication date yet.

Is the Evidentia Quickstart Guide obsolete?

 

Absolutely not!  We have revised the QSG, and the new edition is at the printers.

 

However the changes are minimal, a few images, some color changes.  And the meat of the Guide is exactly the same- the software and the original QSG are almost perfectly aligned now.

 Where are the video tutorials?

They are coming…

Who are the people on the cover of the book and DVD?

OK, from left to right, my paternal grand father, his paternal grandmother (my 3rd GGM), and my maternal great grandparents in their native Italy.



I hope you enjoy using Evidenta 3 as much as I enjoyed creating it.  And as always, your feedback is welcome.